Journal CNE Modules

This article addresses limited vaccination coverage by providing an overview of the epidemiology of influenza, pertussis, and pneumonia, and the impact these diseases have on work attendance for the worker, the worker’s family, and employer profit. Studies focused on the cost of vaccination programs, lost work time, lost employee productivity and acute disease treatment are discussed, as well as strategies for increasing vaccination coverage to reduce overall health care costs for employers. Communicating the benefits of universal vaccination for employees and their families and combating vaccine misinformation among employees are outlined. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(12):508-515.
Increasing the number of individuals adequately immunized to prevent illness is a goal of community health nursing, but achieving this goal among occupational groups such as farmers remains a challenge. This article shares the process and outcome of a community-based participatory research project designed to provide tetanus immunizations to farmers. Key agricultural partners were identified in south central Kentucky and these individuals coordinated the site selection, advertisement, and recruitment for a tetanus immunization program. A total of 280 farmers or individuals associated with farming were surveyed over a 7-month period. The participants had limited knowledge of tetanus etiology and 84% of the participants either reported no tetanus booster in the past 10 years or did not know their tetanus immunization status. Positive outcomes included increasing the tetanus immunization rate among participating farmers and facilitating partnerships with community agencies and organizations. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(11):476-481.]
Occupational stress is a major physical and mental hazard for many workers and has been found to contribute to cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, mood disturbances, workplace injuries, and mental health problems. Health care utilization related to these physical and mental health problems costs employers billions of dollars annually. To combat this problem, employers should adopt a preventive approach and institute organizational and administrative changes that require the participation of both management and workers. This article reviews policies that could impact the quality of work life and influence organizational changes needed to achieve occupational health and safety. Occupational health nurses play a vital role in designing and implementing policies to improve work environments and reduce occupational
stress. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(10):432-438.]
This article explores how physiotherapy has been recognized as a new addition to occupational health departments. Despite the recognition and progressive implementation of physiotherapy in occupational health, evidence of role efficacy is limited. The authors critically reviewed the literature on the role and responsibilities of physiotherapists in occupational health. A comprehensive literature search was conducted. Numerous databases were electronically searched between 1990 and 2013. The literature review revealed limited evidence that physiotherapists have a role in evaluating health outcomes, conducting workplace assessments, managing musculoskeletal caseloads to reduce absenteeism, and in accepting both clinical and management referrals. More research is needed to consolidate physiotherapy's role in occupational health and strengthening the evidence base.
Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(8):342-349.]
Nurses’ use of the Internet and social media has surfaced as a critical concern requiring further exploration and consideration by all health care organizations and nursing associations. In an attempt to support this need, the American Nurses Association (2011) published six principles of social networking that offered guidance and direction for nurses. In addition, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2011) published a nurse’s guide to using social media. Surfing the Internet and using social media for professional and personal needs is extremely common among nurses. What is concerning is when nurses do not separate their professional and personal presence in the virtual world. This article presents an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot survey that explored nurses’ use of social media personally and professionally and offers recommendations specifically directed to the occupational health nurse. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(7):302-306.]
This issue of Workplace Health & Safety contains a Continuing Nursing Education Module on “Shift Work and Employee Fatigue: Implications for Occupational Health Nursing.” 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Agency-Hired Hotel Housekeepers: An At-Risk Group for Adverse Health Outcomes,” is also presented in the February 2014 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
Disaster Readiness for Nurses in the Workplace: Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Effectiveness of an On-site Health Clinic at a Self-Insured University: A Cost-Benefit Analysis,” is also presented in the April 2014 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Establishing the Value of Occupational Health Nurses’ Contributions to Worker Health and Safety: A Pilot Test of a User-Friendly Estimation Tool,” is also presented in the January 2014 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Leveraging Best Practices to Promote Health,Safety, Sustainability, and Stewardship,” is also presented in the August 2013 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the post test and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Occupational Chemical Exposures Among Cosmetologists: Risk of Reproductive Disorders,” is also presented in the December 2013 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “Review of Worksite Weight Management Programs,” is also presented in the March 2014 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.
This online Continuing Nursing Education Module, “The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners and Medical Certification of Interstate Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers,” is also presented in the November 2013 issue of the AAOHN Journal. 1.0 contact hour of continuing nursing education credit will be awarded by AAOHN upon successful completion of the posttest and evaluation.

The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. is an Approved Provider of continuing nursing education by the
American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.


The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. is additionally approved as a CNE provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing (#CEP9283).