COCA Update: New "Zika Virus: Information for Clinicians" Slide Set

COCA News and Announcements

CDC Emergency Response
2016 Zika Virus

NEW: Zika Virus: Information for Clinicians Slide Set
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/clinicianppt.pdf

Print Resources in Different Languages
CDC fact sheets and posters for distribution to patients are available in languages, including Spanish, Arabic, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Mandarin, Creole, and Korean. These resources cover a variety of topics, including travel information, insect repellent, sexual transmission, and mosquito control. 
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/fs-posters/index.html

Clinicians Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age
Consultation Service for Healthcare Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Infection
CDC maintains a 24/7 consultation service for health officials and healthcare providers caring for pregnant women.  To contact the service, call 770-488-7100 or email ZIKAMCH@cdc.gov.

Tools for Healthcare Providers
View printable and easy-to-use CDC fact sheets, guidance documents, and testing algorithms for Zika virus infection.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/tools.html

CDC Begins Reporting Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes of Women Affected by Zika Virus During Pregnancy
CDC began reporting poor outcomes of pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection. CDC will report two types of outcomes:
- Live-born infants with birth defects
- Pregnancy losses with birth defects
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/pregnancy-outcomes.html

Doctor’s Visit Checklist: For Pregnant Women Who Traveled to an Area with Zika
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/docvisit-checklist-travelpreg.pdf

Doctor’s Visit Checklist: For Pregnant Women Living in an Area with Zika
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/zika-clinicvisit-checklist.pdf

MMWR: Interim Guidance for Healthcare Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States, 2016
CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. healthcare providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure  to include recommendations for counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. The updated guidelines also include recommendations for Zika virus testing and guidance for women residing along the US-Mexico Border.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6512e2er.htm?s_cid=mm6512e2er_w

MMWR: Preventing Transmission of Zika Virus in Labor and Delivery Settings Through Implementation of Standard Precautions — United States, 2016
CDC recommends Standard Precautions in all healthcare settings to protect both healthcare personnel and patients from infection with Zika virus as well as from blood-borne pathogens (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]).
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6511e3.htm?s_cid=mm6511e3_w

Questions and Answers For Healthcare Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/qa-pregnant-women.html
 

 

Clinicians Caring for Infants and Children
Congenital Microcephaly Case Definitions
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/public-health-partners/microcephaly-case-definitions.html

Questions and Answers For Healthcare Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/qa-pediatrician.html
 
MMWR: Interim Guidelines for Healthcare Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection — United States, February 2016
CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. healthcare providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6507e1.htm

Sexual Transmission
MMWR: Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus — United States, 2016
The following recommendations apply to men who have traveled to or reside in areas with active Zika virus transmission and their female or male sex partners. These recommendations replace the previously issued recommendations and are updated to include time intervals after travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission or after Zika virus infection for taking precautions to reduce the risk for sexual transmission.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6512e3er.htm?s_cid=mm6512e3er.htm_w

Zika and Sexual Transmission
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/transmission/sexual-transmission.html

Zika Travel Information
Technical Statement on the Role of Disinsection in the Context of Zika Outbreaks, 2016
CDC does not recommend routine use of insecticides (disinsection) inside commercial passenger airplanes to prevent the spread of Zika virus.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/vector/disinsection.html

CDC Issues Advice for Travel to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/alert/2016-summer-olympics-rio

Clinical Evaluation and Testing
NEW: Official CDC Health Alert Network (HAN) Health Update—CDC Recommendations for Subsequent Zika IgM Antibody Testing
Testing for Zika virus infection using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) molecular assays is now commercially available. CDC provides further recommendations for actions to take when requesting Zika rRT-PCR testing from a commercial laboratory.
http://emergency.cdc.gov/han/han00392.asp

MMWR: Interim Guidance for Interpretation of Zika Virus Antibody Test Results
If serologic testing indicates recent flavivirus infection that could be caused by either Zika or dengue virus, patients should be clinically managed for both infections because they might have been infected with either virus. Patients with clinically suspected dengue should receive appropriate management to reduce the risk for hemorrhagic medical complications.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6521e1.htm?s_cid=mm6521e1_e

Official CDC HAN Health Update—Diagnostic Testing of Urine Specimens for Suspected Zika Virus Infection
https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/han00389.asp

MMWR: Interim Guidance for Zika Virus Testing of Urine — United States, 2016
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6518e1.htm?s_cid=mm6518e1_w

Diagnostic Testing
Contact your state or local health department to facilitate testing.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/diagnostic.html

Collection and Submission of Body Fluids for Zika Virus Testing
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/body-fluids-collection-sumbission.html

CDC and OSHA Issue Interim Guidance for Protecting Workers from Occupational Exposure to Zika Virus
CDC and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued new guidance and information for protecting workers from occupational exposure to Zika virus.
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor/mosquito-borne/pdfs/osha-niosh_fs-3855_zika_virus_04-2016.pdf#page=1

Biosafety Guidance for Transportation of Specimens and for Work with Zika Virus in the Laboratory
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/state-labs/biosafety-guidance.html

Clinical Evaluation & Disease
Zika virus is transmitted to humans primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. Most people infected with Zika virus are asymptomatic. Characteristic clinical findings are acute onset of fever with maculopapular rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis. Other commonly reported symptoms include myalgia and headache.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/clinicalevaluation.html

State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Health Department Resources
NEW: CDC Emergency Vector Control Request Form
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/public-health-partners/zika-vector-control-arf-2yearcontract.xlsx  

CDC Draft Interim Zika Response Plan
The purpose of this document is to describe the CDC response plan for the first locally acquired cases of Zika virus infection in the continental United States and Hawaii.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/zika-draft-interim-conus-plan.pdf  

Zika Action Plan Summit Follow-up Teleconferences
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/public-health-partners/zap-teleconferences.html

U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry
CDC has established the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry to learn more about pregnant women in the United States with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants and is collaborating with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments to collect information about pregnancy and infant outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy.  
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/registry.html

Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS)/Sistema de Vigilancia Activa de Zika en Embarazos (SVAZE)
The Puerto Rico Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed a surveillance system called Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS)/Sistema de Vigilancia Activa de Zika en Embarazos (SVAZE). The surveillance system will be used to evaluate the association between Zika virus infection during pregnancy and adverse outcomes during pregnancy, birth, and early childhood up to 3 years old. 
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/public-health-partners/zapss.html

Pregnant women with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in the United States and territories, 2016
These data reflect pregnant women in the US Zika Pregnancy Registry and the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System in Puerto Rico.
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/pregwomen-uscases.html 

Zika Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication Discussions
To address the communication concerns and needs of state, local, and territorial health communicators, as well as partner organizations, CDC is hosting a series of Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) teleconferences related to Zika issues. These teleconferences will be held on a weekly basis beginning Tuesday, May 17, from 1-2 pm (Eastern Time). Each week, a new topic will be presented on a different aspect of CERC.
https://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/zika-teleconferences.asp

Top 10 Zika Response Planning Tips: Brief Information for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Health Officials
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/public-health-partners/tips.html

Zika Virus Microsite
CDC has developed an easily embeddable collection of Zika virus information for partner and stakeholder websites. This collection, called a microsite, can supplement partner web sites with CDC’s up-to-date, evidence-based content. The content is automatically updated when CDC’s website is updated.
https://tools.cdc.gov/medialibrary/index.aspx#/microsite/id/234558

 

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